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As with any other problem in your life, admitting you need help is the first step.

But where to get that help? For people who like to be in control (as I’m betting you do) – it’s not easy. If you admit that you need help, you admit that you do not in fact have all of your crap together.

Good news. No one thought you did anyway.

Except maybe you. You thought you had it all under control. You thought you could take care of yourself.

Get over it. 

When there are people in your life who genuinely love you and are better at something than you are – you can (and should) accept help from them.

So, so, so much easier said than done. And I know this, because I speak from deep wells of experience.

I’m married to this guy who is excellent with money. Like over the top, never has problems, doesn’t even know what living paycheck to paycheck feels like. Yet, I insist on managing it myself.

And until very, very recently, I have outright refused to use the principles he’s tried to teach me.

Is it just because I’m a stubborn bi-otch? Maybe.

But, it’s also because I don’t want him to think I’m stupid. Or inadequate. Because if I can’t do this, he will think I can’t do a hundred other things.

And while there is the possibility that this is accurate – there is a greater possibility that it’s not. Because he’s known me for twenty years. And he is well aware that I kick ass in several areas.

The real problem is in me, and the walls I put up around myself. The persona I want people to see is my real downfall. By hiding or denying the fact that I am not, in fact, Wonder Woman, I make my weaknesses that much stronger. I give them all the power.

If I could just let myself be weak in this area, and let someone who cares about me, help me – maybe I could actually change. Maybe I could learn something, and stop sucking with money.

Just because you suck at one thing, doesn’t mean everyone is going to think you suck at everything.

I know this, deep in my bones – because there are people who have seen me attempt to bowl, and they still think I’m amazing.

I don’t want to get better at bowling, but I do want to get better with money. And I know I can’t do it alone. So, I’m going to start a little program. It’s gonna last for thirty days – and it’s going to be cheap. There will be weekly videos and worksheets. There will be a Facebook Support Group. And there will be Q&A.

I’ve been wanting to do this for awhile – but I am not a financial guru, so I tell myself that I have no business doing it.

And that’s true.

But I paid off $64,000 in credit card debt in two years. And if I did it once, I can do it again.